I love this clip

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Re: I love this clip

Post  melvinfferd on Fri Jan 18, 2008 7:45 am

bryson and nick,

how do you define a non-traditional martial artist? or does such an individual not exist?

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Re: I love this clip

Post  Ken Fortunato on Fri Jan 18, 2008 8:15 am

Bryson Keenan wrote:...what most of the folk in here are calling tma, I refer to as 'classical' ma. and I think there is a place for it, but it isn't fighting...! hehe

as I sid in an earlier post, I think YOU are still a traditional martial artist by my definition (see previos post), you just no longer study classical ma...

Bryson, Although I have no disagreement with your labels or your definitions of those labels, I do think that we're all arguing over nothing. I honestly believe that everyone should create themselves, with rock solid principles and move forward in whatever manner that suits that person's goals, and whatever those goals may be.

"MY" reason for being here is to better define what "I" do! I don't give a rat's fat ass about any of the historic martial arts gurus or their styles and I never did. Those guys never did shit for me. I owe them NOTHING!!! I'm definitely not interested in the historical preservation of anything, including my own method. In my opinion, the blind loyalty to a "system" or "style" is the root cause of all these problems. Pay respect if you feel the need to, but create yourself! That's the way that I see it.

The bottom line? Define what "YOU" do and do it, regardless of what anyone thinks.

Bryson Keenan wrote:plese excure my scrappy typing; I am doing this on my pda in the car on the wy home from work!

No problem! I can read PDA language. Laughing Cool

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Re: I love this clip

Post  BN on Fri Jan 18, 2008 8:15 am

Tommy,

I totally agree. It's not the techniques. It's the way they are trained that make the difference as to whether they can be applied under pressure or not.

If it were only about technique all anyone would have to do would be to learn some, and hey presto! instant fighter. However, as I am sure everyone is aware, it is not what or how many techniques you know that makes the fighter.

It's the training methods that determine if you can be succesful or not. Because it's the training methods that shape/forge the practitioner.
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Re: I love this clip

Post  Ken Fortunato on Fri Jan 18, 2008 8:24 am

Tommy_P wrote:These days I don't care anymore. I'm tired of debating over it and the arguments go round and round. It takes more effort than its worth. I don't care about styles or names or anything other than "training" methods. Just being the wrong guy to fuck with.

Tommy

Agreed!!! Let your ability do the talkin'.

It's like those age old questions; "Can you beat that guy?"; "Will that work in real life?", and all of the "What if" bullshit.

My answer (and yours as well, I think) is; "I don't know". "Attack me and we'll see how it goes". Laughing

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Re: I love this clip

Post  Ken Fortunato on Fri Jan 18, 2008 8:30 am

Bloody Nuisance wrote:It's the training methods that determine if you can be succesful or not. Because it's the training methods that shape/forge the practitioner.

It's the principles applied to training, in the most realistic way possible, as often as possible, with a realistic view of what the potential threat is.

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Re: I love this clip

Post  Guest on Fri Jan 18, 2008 10:08 am

As far as traditional "training" mistakes kata is a big one. It isn't really adressing a fight or a self defense situation for that matter although many believe so. At one time maybe that was a good way of transferring information. Maybe it was also a bit of a cultural thing and the information was transferred in the form of some ritualistic dance. Who cares? Why do we need that today when we have video, books photos and the ability to test things out in the open (no more training in secret)?

Just show me the technique, I don’t need the whole kata to lug around on my back. Show me the application or defense, the body position, the strategy for using it and let’s practice “that.” What do I need the whole dance for? Personally I don’t think anyone has a clear idea of what the hell kata were about anyway. Why should I waste time on something that the creators aren’t around to explain? I’ve been up and down this kata thing and went the bunkai route, and trained with some of the “Guru’s etc. For example Vince Morris, whom by the way I find to be a great guy, had some interesting things to show me in my couple of visits there and the hours of personal time with him before any training time. It was all very interesting, as well as applicable, and he ties it all to kata application. Now it works well and looks like it came from the kata but I’m not into it to be honest. Things like that remind me of drawings found on cave walls that were done by cave men a million years ago showing what people believe to be space craft. To them it proves that we have been visited by aliens. If you believe in life on other planets then that’s what it will look like to you. If not then it may just look like a mistake that the caveman was trying to scratch out! Some people read Nostradamus and believe he has foreseen the future. Others think it is meaningless dribble. It all comes down to what you want to believe. Most traditionalists see things within defenses that they swear came right out of kata. Yes, and that cloud formation overhead looks just like a horse….if you look real hard!

Personally I don’t have the time, just give me the goods and give it to me straight. You have an application? Great, show it to me without mentioning a kata…who cares where it came from…maybe you believe that…..me? I don’t care. All I need is the techniques. And if the technique has to be altered even slightly when used outside the solo kata then that makes no sense. Practice it exactly how you would use it.

Some traditionalists hold on dearly to things like knife hand strikes to the throat or stomps to the knees etc. Ok great I see those in karate techniques. A knife hand to the throat can be very good in an altercation. “BUT” knowing how to perform it doesn’t mean you can use it. The technique has to come within the fight which means you have to know “how” to fight first in order to get to the point (that you created) to be able to apply such a technique. You have to know the rest of the formula, not just one ingredient. Most schools don’t teach this way because they are too busy working on getting the fingers lined up correctly in that knife hand block or marching up and down the floor. This is all a modern thing however and not modern meaning the 30’s or even the 20’s. I’m talking about soon after Chinese methods may have blended with the child’s street fighting game in Okinawa; Tegumi. As soon as some one created a “system.” With a syllabus…..way back.

I think people that don’t really fight have a skewed vision of things. I was for many years one of the most traditional guys (and a kata advocates) you could meet. But I also knew about how things went down in the real world. So with that I always altered my traditional stuff to suit my needs (outside the dojo). But I’m not a fool! I often hear the claim, from the traditional side, that “we are not sport.” “We don’t compete in MMA because we can’t…our techniques are too deadly” Or “MMA has rules and we don’t…a real fight has no rules.” Well, I’m sure you’ve heard it all. Ok, so what does that mean dummy? What is MMA? “MIXED Martial Arts!” That means it is a blend of a lot of things…karate included. These are gentleman who have trained in traditional arts but became a bit more progressive and diverse in their training. So all the little tricks or “deadly’ techniques you know, and all the eye pokes or knee breaks or whatever, are also known by the MMA fighter. So! With that in mind let’s get back to the “rules” issue.
The rules are also holding back the MMA fighter who also knows what you know….”PLUS” what he knows. You still want to get in there without rules?

So yes, you can train "traditionally" in the vein of doing it the old way. A method that may or may not have contained "everything" ground fighting included. I don't disagree with that and as a matter of fact I have argued for the same thing for years. I believe I even emailed Steve about this last year. But I have come into the realization (and the comfort zone) that it eventually just becomes "your own thing." If you have gone back to what you believe, as I did, is the old way by blending then you could change out the word "blended" for mixed. Sound familiar? So then why cling to cultural baggage like Asian style names and uniforms and bowing and lining up and kihon and things that have nothing to do with fighting? There are more modern ways of training the heart of the matter...."fighting."

Tommy

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Re: I love this clip

Post  steve morris on Fri Jan 18, 2008 10:17 am

I enjoyed that Tommy.
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Re: I love this clip

Post  Ken Fortunato on Fri Jan 18, 2008 10:53 am

Damn Tommy! That post covered a lot of ground bro.

And, not that I'm taking any credit whatsoever for how you've evolved, but you're starting to sound a lot like me. Laughing Cool

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Re: I love this clip

Post  BN on Fri Jan 18, 2008 11:24 am

Hi Ken,

Yeah I agree, but "training" is simply a process which incorporates all the things that you mentioned.
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Re: I love this clip

Post  Ken Fortunato on Fri Jan 18, 2008 12:00 pm

Bloody Nuisance wrote:Hi Ken,

Yeah I agree, but "training" is simply a process which incorporates all the things that you mentioned.

Yup! Sorry man! I'm not trying to nit-pick. I suppose that I'm still a little gun shy from hanging on overly anal MA forums. Laughing Cool

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Re: I love this clip

Post  Rob Mac on Fri Jan 18, 2008 12:04 pm

Good stuff Tommy. Just to add a few thigs about mixing it up. I've fought in many stand-up full contact fights and have been for many years very sceptical about the efficacy of takedowns etc, wrongly believing that I could handle any situation by applying knees or whatever as said grappler comes at me. Anyway, as I've said, I teach stand-up to a couple of guys who fight in mma comps. To learn the groundwork one of the guys has been training in Marbella, twice a week as well as 3 times with me (two hour journey to Marbella each way) . Anyway he's got pretty good and now we've got some mats etc so we had a go the other night. I got fucking mullered on the floor. None the things I thought I'd get away with worked and I got taught a proper lesson. People who have never been to the floor just don't know how knackering it is, and those who say they will never go to the floor are talking shit(like I used to) unless they have trained sprawls etc, and even then it's hard. I've only once gone to the floor in a street fight so I'm not one of those who seem to think that every fight ends on the floor, does it fuck, but this stuff is an important part of training and very good for stamina. God I even bore myself sometimes, hope you get the jist. Cheers Rob
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Re: I love this clip

Post  Ken Fortunato on Fri Jan 18, 2008 12:12 pm

Good post Rob! You speak the truth.

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Re: I love this clip

Post  Guest on Fri Jan 18, 2008 12:47 pm

Rob,

I hear ya.
Last year I began training in BJJ and made it clear that I wasn't there to become a ground fighter. I prefer a knockout...I just wanted to learn how "not to" go down there. Or at least get up fast if I do.
I would never assume that I could just figure something out off the top of my head and always need to investigate. Would I practice knife defenses without understanding knife attacks? So let me see what it is I will be defending against with this ground fighting stuff. Well, as you already said, I was surprised! I'd say that a blue belt in BJJ would whip 95% of Shotokan black belts.

And that's not to mention fighting for long periods and trying not to panic or quit when your buried under a 250 lbs bastard with your head buried in his belly and you can't fucking breath! I'm 51 and I was fighting with 25 and 30 year olds and was damn proud that I was able to eventually fight for 40 minutes straight with no rest. Well other than your own manufactured rests through playing the game of chess that is BJJ. It truly was an awakening. But I'm still a standup guy Very Happy Well, I say that more than I do it. I do train hard and I do fight and spar but I'm not doing anything special. Sometimes I'm fighting only once per week and although it's hard it isn't "everything" I want. These days I just train to stay in it "and" stay prepared in case I do decide to get in the cage before I'm too old!!! But mostly I train for the street because that is where most of my experiences lie outside of my martial arts fighting. Unfortunately I wasn't the bouncer or the security guy....I was the "other" guy Rolling Eyes But I think that gives me a different perspective and I know how shit goes down as well as about being on the ground in that regard Shocked And from that, is where I have drawn my training preferences for traditional karate. I always tweaked it. I envy guys like you who are applying what they are doing more readily these days and getting out there and fighting more meaningful shit than I am. Never too old I guess...right?

I can understand what this thread is about because what I just wrote is pretty much how I always trained and did things. The only difference is that before I used to say that what I was doing was just a "deeper understanding" of traditional karate. That was my way of justifying traditional training. But I was living two separate lives. One was my traditional training with all the excess baggage and the other was what I did in private on my own time. What a fucking juggling act!! I was Shotokan but fought and trained as well as taught, close fighting, leg kicks, knees and elbows, a more round punching style, a chopping punch, Goju techniques, Sanchin, Shorin and a completely different training approach than Shotokan. And that doesn't even take into account "my own" personal training, which was a whole other animal.

So, I was (and who knows maybe still am?) a little like what this thread was about. I called everything karate....shit even my webpage is called karate! But truth be told I really don't care and I only care about being a bad mother fucker. Maybe I'm not even that, but who cares as long as it keeps me training hard. I don't have time to think or worry about labels.

Actually I can't believe I'm even involved in this thread when i swore off forums awhile back. Besides the fact that this is the only forum I belong to at the moment and it is only because I am into what Steve has to offer and I don't want to discuss all the other fluff and rhetoric. I only want better insights into what Steve is dishing out. As for the traditional stuff....well I know all about it already, I don't need to keep debating or trying to prove anything. Yea i said it..."I know it all...and it didn't take a lifetime.!" Cool
Tommy

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Re: I love this clip

Post  Jeff Menapace on Sat Jan 19, 2008 12:24 pm

This is great stuff gentlemen.

I am a school teacher by day and a writer by night (just finished my second novel)
My first novel dealt with a lot of violence, sex, (are you hooked yet?) and of course, martial arts. It was told in a first person perspective.

There is a part in the book towards the end where the main character (a scrappy guy who has trained in a few arts and has had some real fights) has to figure out a way to take out (kill) a sicko businessman who is shadowed by his two Russian bodyguards. He finds out the brutal background of the Russians and then goes on a rant about why most karate taught today stinks and then addresses MMA and such. It's quite similar to Tommy's discussion here!

If you are interested Steve, maybe I can figure out a way to copy and paste an excerpt of it for you.

All the best guys. Keep the info. coming.

Jeff
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Re: I love this clip

Post  steve morris on Mon Jan 21, 2008 6:37 am

What I'm really trying to find out here is how many of you are currently engaged in, or are engaging your students in, some form of competitive training or dissimilar/aggressor training that will prepare them for the streets. I'm talking about full contact stuff.

If you're teaching, I'm not interested in how many people you've knocked out or what hard training you've done personally; I've done all that. I'm talking about what your students are doing that will prepare THEM for the reality of a violent encounter.

In other words, everybody in my gym engages in some form of full contact work, drilling or fighting, pitched to them at the level where they are. Women, young people, and men.

As a separate point, I hear a lot about Bob Jones, who is a contemporary of mine but from the other side of the world. Now, I know that what I was involved in during the sixties and seventies and even eighties was essential to my development, but I have changed a great deal since then. If I could go back and do it all again, I'd take a very different approach.

As somebody who has spent most of my life experimenting, I'd be curious as to what Bob Jones is into these days. I used to investigate everything and anything, but in recent years I've discarded a great deal and concentrated my efforts on certain key areas. It would be interesting to see if there are any parallels between the two of us, or not. Anybody know? There isn't very much on his site about what he's doing currently and why.
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Bob Jones

Post  Bryson Keenan on Mon Jan 21, 2008 9:18 am

Hi Steve,
i am bob's rep in south east asia; strted training with him in 72...
the last ?eight? years, he has been seriously into aikido; not the 'power of ki' stuff, but the evasion, entering, control and energy transference aspects.

the school still has muay thai classes, etc.

he has a freestyle ma syllabus with no kata, which is a distillation of his experience.

arnis is another offering. some students just prctice one art; others crosstrain...

his system is a work in progress, which doesnt suit some. i stopped training with him for time when i just didnt get it, but came bck when i realised that i had turned a corner and ended up back on the same street!

he is purist, who is constantly evolving and adapting his sysyem.

he is currently in europe, researching his celtic roots. i'd love to get him in touch with you. i will try to call him tomorrow...

he virtually singlehandedly introduced full contact (kickboxing, us and european style; kyokushin was already there) to australia as well as pioneer muay thai.

grappling has been part of the curriculum for some years now

and the list goes on...

happy to elaborate by pm...

slainte,

bryson
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Re: I love this clip

Post  Nick Hughes on Mon Jan 21, 2008 9:31 am

Well, to be honest I do not do a whole bunch of full contact training with my guys (America is so litigous that insurance for that type of training is ludicrously expensive)

We do regular sparring, tons of scenarios, focus mitt and pad work and usually put the gloves on once a year at boot camp (where we train normally the floor is concrete...boot camp is on the beach and on the grass so I'm more comfortable letting them snot one another)

Does it work? I've taken one slightly smaller than average guy to work the door with me after about a years training. He hadn't been in any fights since school and used to be a chef.

He's been in about seven altercations that I'm aware of and hasn't lost one. The very first one ever was a set up by an evil little shite that threw one of the be best and fastest sucker punches I've ever seen. I was too far away dealing with his mates to do anything but, I needn't have worried. Dan slipped it and drilled the prick which I thought was awesome for his first real fight since school.

Another of my guys (I'd mentioned this one before because initially we thought it was bullshite) was accosted in the parking lot of a nearby restaurant by a guy with a pistol, and this was after six weeks of training. He took the gun away and whipped the guy with it.

We all talked about it and decided he was big timing himself but a few weeks later we were at the same restaurant and one of the waiters said "oh you're the guy who trains Chris...man, that was crazy, that guy pulling a gun on him. Did the cops ever talk to you about it?" Turns out it was all true.

So, in short, do I think full contact training is valuable? Yes. It answers tons of questions such as can I take a punch, what's it like to hit someone with intent, what's it like to try and tie up someone who's resisting etc. Do I think it's absolutely necessary to be able to prevail in the street...it would seem that it isn't.

Nick
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Re: I love this clip

Post  Nick Hughes on Mon Jan 21, 2008 9:33 am

Steve,

I forgot...I'm curious as to your take on the helmet's the guys were wearing and the various posts saying they lulled people into a false sense of security while at the same time they made being knocked out easier.

Surely, if they made being knocked out easier, guys would be even more intent on protecting their heads and not less. Yes or No?

Nick
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Re: I love this clip

Post  steve morris on Mon Jan 21, 2008 10:51 am

I can see where you'd run into insurance problems especially in the States. For example, even here I couldn't do Earlham Street again. But realising that, I had to come up with a way of getting guys accustomed to the experience of a fight without killing them or hurting them. Christ, I take executives who have to go out on sales calls the next day and could sue me so I'd be in hock for the next million years!

There's a method, there is a way. I've found it. And with regard to your guys who did get through real encounters, it would only add to their experience. For the others, who have never been tested, it would give them the experience.

On the headguards: I'm only commenting on what I observe. It's interesting that melvinfferd said that they've changed the headguard since then. I'd like to know why.

I've knocked a lot of guys out, and I've seen a lot of knockouts. The physical effort required to do that was tremendous. Sure, it sometimes happens with less, but on the whole it's a big explosive effort. I didn't see that on the knockouts on the clip. And so it raised the question: was there a possibility of the helmet contributing to the rotational force of the head, along with the glove? The bigger the helmet, the more the rotation. Your brain in your skull is already like an egg in a box. Now it's inside another box, and everything's been shook. There's a lot of rebound fucking energy going on in there.

The other thing I observe is that the fighters are neglecting to guard their head the way they should. I've seen that a lot in knockdown in Japan, where the head looks like it's asking to be hit.

As I said in my first post, paradoxically you see the apparently easier knockout and you see the lack of head defence at the same time. Paradoxically--it doesn't make sense. But it's what I observe.

Now why is that happening? I don't know. It seems to be an emphasis on attack attack attack, which leaves very little room for defence and maybe the fact of wearing the helmet encourages that.

For me personally, I wouldn't have my guys using them. They've got to learn to defend their head. It's a major target. I don't even let them wear headguards--it was leading to a careless approach, even in the drilling.

Anyway melvin--any more info on the headguards? Any more recent footage on this using the new helmet? I'm curious. I'm not stating absolutes here, I'm just reacting to what I see.
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Re: I love this clip

Post  Rob Mac on Mon Jan 21, 2008 12:07 pm

Steve, I'm going to get some stuff done wed night. The clip I posted wasn't a great example of our stuff, but you can see the kind of stuff we train for, it's not pretty but there you go. Cheers Rob.
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Re: I love this clip

Post  melvinfferd on Wed Jan 23, 2008 11:15 am

steve morris wrote:It's interesting that melvinfferd said that they've changed the headguard since then. I'd like to know why.

Any more recent footage on this using the new helmet? I'm curious.

steve,
tonight i visited the international headquarters of daido juku. actually met the founder (well i think it was him, looked like him anyway. friendly guy, showed me upstairs to the dojo). unfortunately i didnt get the chance to have a chat (he returned to his workout downstairs).

after watching a class i did speak to the instructor about the new helmets. all the helmets hanging on the wall were the old bubble variety. there was only one of the new style on a shelf. interestingly he said it was only a prototype. the reasons he gave for trying to develop an improved version were 3-fold.

1. the shape of the bubble causes ones punches to easily skim off.

2. clarity was not great due to the type of plastic used.

3. the series of drilled holes on the front of the visor would rip skin off your knuckles (they spar bare-knuckle?)

-so the grouping of air holes was changed and a much clearer plastic was used for the new model. he said vision is better but the different plastic isnt as strong and a few have been shattered due to strikes hence it still being a prototype.

-the new bubble is also not so much a bubble. its been flattened somewhat so a punch straight on is more likely to be transferred into the target. so ironically the new version may actually cause more kos.

-although the shape of the visor has changed, the distance it protruds from ones face hasnt been dramatically altered.

simon

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Re: I love this clip

Post  melvinfferd on Thu Jan 24, 2008 12:26 am

to continue ...

so i guess theres no recent footage available with the new helmet. though i was a little surprised to hear it was still a prototype. especially considering that it looks like its available on the website. i also read somewhere that it may be used in competitions this year. maybe the guy i spoke to wasnt up-to-date with the latest developments?

concerning the class i watched ...

in some respects i had high expectations due to what ive heard about their training intensity. sadly it wasnt my day. it had been snowing all morning so i was informed that they werent expecting many! i thought that was a bit soft but later discovered that the "freefighting" classes for the advanced guys wasnt scheduled for that day anyway.

so only 3 students. the class seemed more of a lesson than training. was formal in atmosphere but low in intensity, more of a general overview of some basics. class started with static stretching then moved onto some air punching. was a discussion on stance and how to form a fist. at one point they stood sideways against a wall to practice their straight punches (shoulder, elbow and fist all in contact with the wall). so not much room for any whip-like action to take place!

the second half of the 2 hour class consisted of throws, a headlock defence and then some groundwork (a turnover from guard). was basic stuff but then it was obvious that it was a general basic class, so not much to draw any conclusions from.

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Re: I love this clip

Post  Bryson Keenan on Thu Jan 24, 2008 1:19 am

Hi simon,

Thanks for that; do you intend to go back for another look when not a beginners' class?

Any comment on the dojo itself? Very dojo-ish, or more modern?

Do you train in Tokyo? If so, where?

I am off to Bali tonight to meet an old mate of mine who used to be Azuma's rep in Australia (Bruce Haynes; concrete-smasher extrordinaire...!); I will quiz him re the comp, the system, the training, etc., and let you know what he reckons...

Cheers,

BK
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Re: I love this clip

Post  Bryson Keenan on Thu Jan 24, 2008 1:39 am

melvinfferd wrote:
1. the shape of the bubble causes ones punches to easily skim off.

Hmmm... I have been using Super Safe since the early 80's and it is a matter of hitting at the appropriate angle, like it is when you hit a head (!); if you throw a straight punch to an angular or curved part of the bollard, you will 'skim off' as well. I think this is more an effort to provide a target for straight punches, to the exclusion of hooks, etc.; more's the pity...

melvinfferd wrote:
2. clarity was not great due to the type of plastic used.

Clarity is usually not great because the bugger fogs up. Some of the Koshiki Karate guys alter their breathing so that they suck in through the mouth and blow out through the nose so that the exhalation goes downward and not straight on to the bubble to condense... All a bit arse about face for me...!

melvinfferd wrote:
3. the series of drilled holes on the front of the visor would rip skin off your knuckles (they spar bare-knuckle?)

We used to call it the 'cheese grater'...! And yes, bare knuckles. Masayuki Hisataka, who developed Super Safe, wanted to have gear to protect the target, so that the weapon didn't have to be covered up or encumbered with a glove. So, back in the late 70's/early 80's, it was all bare knuckles. The Koshiki Karate guys now use a neoprene glove, ostensibly only to prevent knuckle cuts or to prevent blood flying about if there is a cut... Kudo has its own glove...

melvinfferd wrote:
-so the grouping of air holes was changed and a much clearer plastic was used for the new model. he said vision is better but the different plastic isnt as strong and a few have been shattered due to strikes hence it still being a prototype.

-the new bubble is also not so much a bubble. its been flattened somewhat so a punch straight on is more likely to be transferred into the target. so ironically the new version may actually cause more kos.

I am not an engineer, but it would seem that perhaps the new, flatter visor isn't as strong because it is flat rather than curved, as opposed to the plastic being necessarily weaker... Also, the flat screen might flex a little, whereas the bubble stays pretty much as it is... That being said, I have cracked a bubble visor once before and seen it cracked on a number of occasions (its hard tho; trust me!)

I still see Kudo (not Koshiki) as a great bridge between Karate and MMA. At the end of the day, MMA is a full-contact combat sport, and it @#$%ing HURTS. We are never going to get the squillions of MA practitioners around the globe to get in the cage and punch on with the Tank Abbotts of this world (and neither we should, methinks...)

And you don't have to use it only (if at all) in competition training; I use the Super Safe headgear in my scenario training, so that the students can get amongst it and still be able to go and work at the bank on Monday morning without looking like they've been in an altercation with a nightclub bouncer over the weekend...

I look forward to any further reports...

Slainte'

BK
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Bryson Keenan

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Re: I love this clip

Post  melvinfferd on Thu Jan 24, 2008 10:06 am

"do you intend to go back for another look when not a beginners' class?"

not sure. if i did it would be for curiosity only as i dont see myself joining.

"Any comment on the dojo itself? Very dojo-ish, or more modern?"

a 3 story building but actually quite small. first floor is the weights room. third floor is the dojo, tatame floors with two huge life size photos (posters) of the founder breaking blocks of ice on two of the walls. one corner had a lot of equipment - heavy bags leaning against the wall, a lot of thai pads and larger kicking shields. so a mix of old and new. but all the formalities were there in terms of bowing, sitting in lines of rank etc.

"Do you train in Tokyo? If so, where?"

ive trained at a bunch of places, most recently its been muay thai, at a gym run by some thais.

to clarify about the flattened bubble ... its still a bubble of sorts, ie curved. think oval instead of circle. i dont think it would lessen the likelihood of being successful with hooks.

look forward to your mates comments.

melvinfferd

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Re: I love this clip

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