Tiger's Claw considerations

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Tiger's Claw considerations

Post  Dennis M on Sat Jul 07, 2007 3:19 am

We were sent the following by James F, and want to emphasise the importance of this material:

"The most common injury occurs when you strike with the last two knuckles. The 5th metacarpal breaks (between the knuckles of the middle finger and pinkie), commonly referred to as a boxer's fracture," states James Prattas, MD of Metropolitan Hospital in NYC. Dr. Prattas, also a martial artist stated, "I can't think of any reason to strike with a fist over using a palm strike."

"A fracture will take 6-8 weeks to heal, while a sprain (tear in ligament) could take up to 6 months to heal. Rehabilitation could take 3-4 months, according to Faye Grant, a Registered Occupational Therapist, from the Hand Therapy Center, in Floral Park, NY.

Police officers who seriously injured their hands during a violent confrontation were asked if they thought they could get a solid grip on their firearms after the injury. The answer was sometimes, "I don't know," but most often just, "No."

"Grip strength comes from the ulnar side (pinky side) of the hand. A boxer's fracture would significantly affect your grip. Try to hold anything with a handle without using your fourth finger," says Stuart Kandel, Orthopedic Surgeon from Bay Shore, NY. "It would be much easier to disarm an officer who received this fracture."

The Medical Doctors, Physical Therapists and Occupational Therapists the author interviewed all agreed that with the palm strike done correctly the chances of injuring the hand are slim. "The position of Maximum Boney stability in the hand is the close-pack position which is full extension of the hand. Full extension of the hand is the palm strike position," according to Bill Partridge, Physical Therapist of Nassau/Suffolk Physical Therapy in Syosset, NY.

Taking shooting and/or firearm retention into consideration, the palm strike seems to be the logical choice of strikes.

Another serious health related problem we have to consider is cutting the knuckles on the perpetrator's teeth. Punches are usually directed to the head area including the face. The mouth is something you definitely want to avoid. However the teeth may be struck inadvertently. "Everyone you encounter violently has AIDS, until proven otherwise, humans have the most infectious mouths, once you break skin you are introducing all those germs to your body", says Dr. Prattas. "The heel of the palm making impact with the mouth distributes contact area equally making it difficult to break skin if the teeth are struck. With a punch, one knuckle may hit the teeth, breaking skin easily.""The skin on the Dorsal side (top of the hand) is easily cut because it is very thin. The opposite is true of the skin on the palm," says O.T.R. Faye Grant.

According to Dr. Kandel, "When you open your hand from a fist tendons pull back. If the knuckles are cut when a full taut fist strikes teeth the act of opening the hand pulls bacteria in. Serious infection can set in 24-48 hours later".

Germs do not fester as easily in the fleshy palm of the hand as they do in the knuckles. There have been cases where cuts caused by human teeth on knuckles resulted in the hand being surgically removed to stop the spread of Gangrene.
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This was extracted from our Classic Strikes FAQ on the Tigers Claw, and more detail will be found there.
Cheers,
Den

Dennis M
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Re: Tiger's Claw considerations

Post  Jeff Menapace on Sat Jul 07, 2007 9:45 am

Another serious health related problem we have to consider is cutting the knuckles on the perpetrator's teeth.

This is my main concern Den. Personally, I have no problem walking away with a broken hand. They have healed everytime and still work fine now(knock, knock). Obviously things would be different for those needing to work a firearm etc.

I always felt that breaking the hand (for civilians) was at the bottom of the list of concerns, yet exchanging fluids, well... affraid
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Re: Tiger's Claw considerations

Post  Dennis M on Sat Jul 07, 2007 2:06 pm

I've seen a guys hand swell to the size of a boxing glove after punching someone in the mouth, and getting infected from a tooth.
Another doorman injured his thumb by punching to the head, and lost the part from the top joint due to bone infection.
Some lads I work with have broken their hands so many times from using boxing punches in the street, that they have very little grip, or dexterity left.
Open hands are the way to go.
Den

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Hmm?

Post  soejames on Tue Jul 10, 2007 4:03 am

Tiger Claw??

Don't you mean punching only good for soft tissue targets?
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Re: Tiger's Claw considerations

Post  Dennis M on Tue Jul 10, 2007 11:18 am

James,
Can you elaborate on your questions a bit. I think I know what you are asking, just want to be sure
Den

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Re: Tiger's Claw considerations

Post  soejames on Sat Jul 14, 2007 2:47 am

Puching using a fist and knuckles against bone is not good, much better if you punch to target large muscles ie; stomach, bicep, neck, kidneys...

James
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